FAQ Categories: Wrongful Death

It depends on the circumstances. Of course if the suicide was not anyone’s fault, then there is nobody who should be sued and it would not be appropriate to file a case. However, there are some situations in which a business or person may be responsible for a suicide. One

Yes. Our firm has handled many cases involving alternative types of transportation like motorcycle accidents, bicycle accidents, scooter accidents, or pedestrian accidents. Handling a wrongful death case that involves alternative transportation, like a motorcycle, bicycle, scooter, or pedestrian, involves looking into many of the same factors involved in car or truck accidents.

Yes. Our firm has handled such cases successfully in the past, including a $150 million verdict and a $2.95 million settlement. The jury that heard our closing argument in the video clip below returned a verdict of $150,000,000. Truck accidents and car accidents continue to claim the lives of thousands of Americans per year.

Yes. Our firm has handled such cases successfully in the past, including a recent settlement of $3 million. Often, cases arising from shootings or violent crimes are brought as negligent security cases. That is because businesses like apartment complexes, hotels, restaurants, and clubs have a responsibility to their residents, guests, or customers to

Punitive damages are not available in connection with the wrongful death claims following a person’s death, but they can be available in connection with the estate claims following a person’s death. Georgia courts have consistently held that punitive damages are not available in connection with wrongful death claims because a wrongful death

Georgia law establishes clear rules for where the money goes in a wrongful death case. The Official Code of Georgia says that any money received from a wrongful death case “shall be equally divided, share and share alike, among the surviving spouse and the children.” O.C.G.A. § 51-4-2(d)(1). In other words,

Yes, although that would be a little unusual. It’s often smart to get the administrator of the estate appointed before filing a wrongful death case because the administrator of the estate will usually bring additional claims that will be a part of the same lawsuit. (For more detail

Yes. Whether the decedent died without a will is irrelevant to whether a wrongful death case can be brought (and is usually irrelevant to who can bring a wrongful death case). That is because a will sets up the decedent’s estate, but under Georgia law, the estate claims are different

Georgia law is clear about who can bring a wrongful death claim. It is covered by O.C.G.A. § 51-4-2, § 51-4-4, and § 19-7-1. However, in Georgia, the rules about who can bring the claim are slightly different than the rules about who is entitled to share in the recovery of money received as

Generally, no. If the person who died is survived by a husband or wife, that surviving spouse can bring the wrongful death claim, regardless of whether he or she is appointed as the administrator of the estate. If the decedent did not leave a surviving spouse, then the wrongful death

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